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Historic Sites

Bedens Brook Road Bridge

Bedens Brook Road Bridge
Bedens Brook Road
Montgomery, NJ

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   The Bedens Brook Road Bridge, maintained by Somerset County, is a single-arch, random-rubble stone structure built across a tributary of Bedens Brook. Its construction date is unknown but it is thought to have been constructed in the latter part of the 19th century. The bridge is remarkably intact, retaining its stonework, arch, wing walls and parapets (the low walls along the outside edge of the bridge). It is 20 feet long with a roadway of 16-and-a-half feet. The arch section of the bridge stands six feet high from the stream bed to the top of the arch.

Bedensville Schoolhouse

Bedensville Schoolhouse
244 Orchard Road
Montgomery, NJ 08558

Jackie Weitzner 908-359-8304
info@vanharlingen.org
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   The Bedensville Schoolhouse was built in 1853 in the Dutch style. It was moved to its present site and accurately restored by of the Bicentennial Committee, the Van Harlingen Historical Society, and local residents.  Located on the grounds of the Orchard Hill Elementary School, it is now operated as a living history museum by the Van Harlingen Historical Society.

 

Dirck Gulick House

Dirck Gulick House
506 Belle Mead-Blawenburg Road
Montgomery, NJ 08502

908-359-3498
info@vanharlingen.org
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   The Dirck Gulick House is a small, one-story stone vernacular Dutch structure with segmented arches of stone above the doors and windows, as well as two front entrances. The original stone plaque, which still exists on the front facade, reads:

                           "D + G G  This House Built In the Year 1752."

The use of stone by the Dutch in the Raritan Valley was rare. Since the dwelling was constructed at the base of the Sourland Mountain, the availability of nearby fieldstone may have influenced the use of stone. Dirck Gulick, one of the area's original settlers, purchased the property in 1727. The house is the headquarters of the Van Harlingen Historical Society of Montgomery Township and houses a local research library.

Mill Pond Bridge

Mill Pond Bridge
Dead Tree Run Road over the Pike Run
Montgomery, NJ 08502

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   The Mill Pond Bridge is located in one of the most picturesque areas in Somerset County, the Bridgepoint Historic District. It is a triple arch bridge believed to have been built of random fieldstones in the 1820s.  The bridge was repaired and restored by Somerset County in 2000.

Opossum Road Bridge

Opossum Road Bridge
Opossum Road over Bedens Brook
Montgomery, NJ

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   Built across Bedens Brook in 1822, the Opossum Road Bridge is a double-arched, random-rubble stone bridge which retains its original stonework, arches, parapets and approaches. It is a good example not only of local bridgebuilding methods, but also of stone construction in general in the county. The bridge is 54 feet long, 15 feet wide and rises to a camelback shape at its center, which is 18 feet above the bed of Bedens Brook. The two arches are nine-and-a-half feet high and 20 feet wide. The bridge is maintained by Somerset County.

Rock Brook Bridge

Rock Brook Bridge
Rock Brook Road
Montgomery, NJ 08502

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   The Rock Brook Bridge is a random-rubble stone bridge with two arches and an open span. The bridge is located at the junction of Long Hill and Dutchtown-Zion Roads. H. Hageman, who was almost certainly a local mason, built it in 1825. The open span replaced a third arch, which was washed out by a storm in 1891. The structure is 41 feet long and 16 feet wide. The earliest part of the bridge is a good example of local bridgebuilding methods in the county during the early 19th century, as well as stone construction in general. The bridge is maintained by Somerset County.

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